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FerrousMaverick

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Post your suggestions for a lifter's library of recommended reading. And if you put something like "Napoleon Hill's Think and Grow Rich" I'm going to have to punch you. The titles should be related to weightlifting. And please have a short summary of why the book is so helpful.

Personally, I've gotten a lot of mileage off of these two books:

  • Starting Strength by Dr. Kilgore and Mark Rippetoe. Good foundational information on how to perform the basic lifts and troubleshoot what's going wrong. Excellent resource for beginners.
  • Programming for Strength Training by Dr. Kilgore and Mark Rippetoe. The information on understanding recovery and all the variables that affect it is outstanding and the book is worth it just for that. The programming side is very high level, and only enough to give you a rough idea of how to organize your routine to make progress.

Are there others that should be in just about every lifter's library?

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Does it have to be books? I use a lot of websites now for my info, and there's lots of it available

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Well, anything you read.

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Body Recomposition from Lyle McDonald

Leangains from Martin Berkhan

Alan Aragon's Research Review (by...err.. Alan Aragon)

All three are excellent, but I've listed them in order of preference.

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Guest ExperimentB76z

I'm reading Dan John's, "Never Let Go", at the moment. He's got an easy going prose and a wealth of experience - as much if not more than Rip. He covers everything from diet, to training philosophy, and shares his programming ideas with anecdotes from his training and competition years. There is a good dose of humor too.

I'd recommend it as a light but informative read, especially for people caught up too much on diets, or for people who try too hard and don't understand why things just don't work fo them sometimes. It's a briliant, enjoyable read (as opposed to Rip's books which are written a bit too much like text books, but not enough like proper text books, which makes them annoyingly informative, but lacking in information at the same time). Never Let Go doesn't teach you how to squat in minute detail, but it gives you the benefit of a mans wisdom who's trained himself and others ove the decades (and like many of us, gone from skinny to finding himself fat and the journey back again, and out again, and back again).

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I really got a lot of the recent book Fit by Lon Kilgore, Michael Hartman and Justin Lascek.

It tries to approach fitness with a very holistic approach-- basically, training for strength, endurance and mobility on top of a strength foundation. I guess you could call it "Crossfit without the random nonsense" or "Crossfit with structure and goals".

Great things in this book include:

- sample training progressions for a very wide variety of experience levels and goals (including a - gasp!- machines to barbells progression for sedentary populations)

- theory and training progressions for training endurance conditioning

- theory and training progressions for mixed strength / conditioning goals

- a very non-dogmatic tone: for example, bodybuilding and endurance training are treated as serious and worthy goals, full-range olympic squats are treated as a reasonable alternative to power squats

My only complaints about the book were that it has no index, that it was too short (at over 300 pages!), and some of the writing has not been polished (there are some grammatical errors and cornball jokes that don't really detract from the text but give it a rough feel). I would add more to the mobility section, which is kind of a grab bag - they give sample yoga poses but don't really discuss assessments for healthy ROM at major joints, and then discuss some of the exercises and standards for the NFL combine.

To complement the weaknesses in this book, I would recommend the book/DVD set "Assess and Correct" by Eric Cressey, Mike Robertson, and Bill Hartman. They give self-assessments for evaluating posture and ROM at major joints, as well as dozens of exercises and progressions to correct any posture or ROM issues. The only drawback is the price.... over US$100 when I got it. But it was worth it, compared to getting injured or even spending more time at the therapist.

-

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I'd recommend Dinosaur Training...massive collection of really interesting and useful training ideas. And Kubik makes you feel proud to train, and you're tempted to put the book down and go do so, haha.

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I've had a brief look at Beyond bodybuilding by Pavel Tsatsouline. I think it's a collection of his articles and there's a little bit of everything for everyone in that book. Also 5/3/1 by Jim Wendler is a great book. I also like reading articles by Chris Thibadeau over at tnation. I also like the articles over at ampedtraining.com.

Everyone has there own way of training.

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Justin L's book at 70's big on the Texas Method is excellent

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Mastery of Hand Strength by John Brookfield

Full of interesting training methods and analogies from the Man with the strongest hands in the world. Brookfield really shows you that the limit to your hand strength is far higher than you'd ever imagine. Worth googling around for videos of the man as he's quite interesting. He's also one of very few that have closed Captains of Crush #4 if you're interested in the grippers.

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Currently I'm studying Supertraining by Dr, Mell Siff. I have to say that it's a big hard to read book but has tons of studies and information about training in general.

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Guest ExperimentB76z

It tries to approach fitness with a very holistic approach-- basically, training for strength, endurance and mobility on top of a strength foundation. I guess you could call it "Crossfit without the random nonsense" or "Crossfit with structure and goals".

Sounds like a worthwhile read.

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Crikey my "Fit" write-up was sloppy.... "training for strength ... on top of a strength foundation".. egadz

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Guest ExperimentB76z

Crikey my "Fit" write-up was sloppy.... "training for strength ... on top of a strength foundation".. egadz

I have, however, bought it on the strength of your review.

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I just ordered 'Fit' as well. I'm gonna need something besides Ancient History/Italian books to read over the coming months, and while one (or more) has priority over Fit, it'll be nice to have.

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Guest ExperimentB76z

I just ordered 'Fit' as well. I'm gonna need something besides Ancient History/Italian books to read over the coming months, and while one (or more) has priority over Fit, it'll be nice to have.

Mine arrived last night and after a quick flick through, I'm already happy with my purchase. They teach the annoying jump version of the power clean though ( :rolleyes: ! ). But it does show you how you can balance your training, and still make strength gains. I haven;t read it properly so cannot comment on grammar and punctuation yet, but meh.

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2 blogs I check all the time: bretcontreras.com & chaosandpain.blogspot.com

Contreras is very knowledgeable, he in particular is the expert on glute activation

Chaos & Pain is hilarious, informative and relaxing.

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2 blogs I check all the time: bretcontreras.com & chaosandpain.blogspot.com Contreras is very knowledgeable, he in particular is the expert on glute activation Chaos & Pain is hilarious, informative and relaxing.

A strange mix of the informative, the boastful and the pornographic.

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I’m interested in the FIT book so it’s nice to see some good reviews.

I agree with the following listed above: Starting strength, Practical Programming, Never Let Go, Chaos and Pain…and I’ll add Lift-Run-Bang.com, Ironmind: Stronger Minds, Stronger Bodies, Better than Steroids, and 5/3/1 (all of which are quick reads). Don’t make the mistake of buying Strong Enough as it’s just a duplicate of the others. If you want to read a book about some dudes kicking ass then try Gates of Fire.

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The Recommended reading from Mehdi actually has four really good books:

"The Way of the Superior Man" by David Deida

"Think and Grow Rich" by Napoleon Hill

"Psychocybernetics" by Maxwell Maltz

"The Education of a Bodybuilder" Arnold's life in a book.

They aren't exactly training related, but they'll still teach you a whole lot and maybe help you with your direction if you lack it.

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See, MatthiahM, you didn't read the opening post: I'm going to have to punch now...

I'd much rather see "Verbal Judo: The Gentle Art of Persuasion" by George J. Thompson and Jerry B. Jenkins than anything called "Think and Grow Rich". At least the author of VJ was a former cop with general bad-assery.

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I didn't read it before I posted, I read it the the thread was started. my bad I must have forgotten...

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Alright, I forgive you. No more getting rich quick now.. :)

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Seriously, I think we've all seen what comes from reading Napoleon Hill...

  • Upvote 2

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I wanna get rich quick! like yesterday quck! How do I do that?!?!?! haha.

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