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BarbEricScotaku

Is Saturated Fat Really Bad For You?

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The age-old mindset, that satfats are BAD4U, and thus you should only eat egg whites and the like. But has the link between that and heart disease ever been conclusively proven? And if it were true, wouldn't native americans and inuit (both with diets that are very low carb, and contain massive amounts of lard and such) be fat and unhealthy, yet they aren't? The latter is more convincing to me than research, since I personally place common sense above science -- which can be -- and often is in the context of health and fitness -- very wrong. But I'm curious as to what you guys think.

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Published in 2010:

 

CONCLUSIONS: A meta-analysis of prospective epidemiologic studies showed that there is no significant evidence for concluding that dietary saturated fat is associated with an increased risk of CHD or CVD. More data are needed to elucidate whether CVD risks are likely to be influenced by the specific nutrients used to replace saturated fat. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20071648

 

If you waste an egg yolk, God tears the wings off an Angel.  Do you want that on your head?

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Here's one from 2014

 

"Conclusion: Current evidence does not clearly support cardiovascular guidelines that encourage high consumption of polyunsaturated fatty acids and low consumption of total saturated fats." (http://annals.org/article.aspx?articleid=1846638)

 

 

 

"RRs for coronary outcomes in prospective cohort studies of dietary fatty acid intake.

Size of the data marker is proportional to the inverse of the variance of the RR. RR = relative risk."

http://annals.org/data/Journals/AIM/929862/6ff1_Figure_1_RRs_for_coronary_outcomes_in_prospective_cohort_studies_of_dietary_fatty_acid_int.jpeg

 

 

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If you waste an egg yolk, God tears the wings off an Angel.  Do you want that on your head?

QFT. And because I loled.

Too lazy to dig up the articles, but I'm under the impression that the 'saturated fat is bad' theory has been discredited for a while now.

And if it were true, wouldn't native americans and inuit (both with diets that are very low carb, and contain massive amounts of lard and such) be fat and unhealthy, yet they aren't?

People don't get fat because of dietary fat, they get fat because they eat too much of whatever it is they eat. And of course it is entirely possible for a human being to be thin and still extremely unhealthy.
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And of course it is entirely possible for a human being to be thin and still extremely unhealthy.

Can't find it right now but I saw stats on how being underweight is even worse than being fat, all other variables being equal. Wouldn't surprise me.

 

Looks like it's time to replace, say, "ingredients: 6 egg whites" to "ingredients: 3 eggs" in my copy of Anabolic Cooking, so as not to harm any angels. :)

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Here's one recent study that concluded that saturated fat intake and saturated fat levels in the blood are not related. 

 

"Effects of Step-Wise Increases in Dietary Carbohydrate on Circulating Saturated Fatty Acids and Palmitoleic Acid in Adults with Metabolic Syndrome"

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0113605

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The age-old mindset, that satfats are BAD4U, and thus you should only eat egg whites and the like. But has the link between that and heart disease ever been conclusively proven? And if it were true, wouldn't native americans and inuit (both with diets that are very low carb, and contain massive amounts of lard and such) be fat and unhealthy, yet they aren't? The latter is more convincing to me than research, since I personally place common sense above science -- which can be -- and often is in the context of health and fitness -- very wrong. But I'm curious as to what you guys think.

No

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