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CarlHmS

Running And Lifting

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Does anyone here run, and train for running?

I know some people who run but don't lift. They run for exercise to stay in shape or lose weight or whatever. They don't seem to be particularly fast (10 minute mile). Being the infinitely curious and competitive and d-bag that I am, I want to be able to best them, and then make fun of them and make them feel bad (just kidding).

 

My experience with running is non existent. I ran a mile once in high school and I ran it sub 8 minute because I was trying to keep up with the cute track girls. I did. Although they appeared to be just phoning it in and I was going all out.

 

Ideally I think I would like to run at least sub 8 again. But that seems lame. However, I think it would be cool to run in 5k increments. I'm curious how hard it is to run a 5k sub 20 minutes? And by that I mean 19:59 would be acceptable. But that would mean a 6:30 pace. How difficult is that?

 

My primary focus will always be lifting and getting stronger though. This is just a curiosity. Are these numbers something that could be achieved without a great dedication to making running my primary goal.? Or will I have to train primarily for running to reach this? I'm not going to sacrifice lifting progress for this. But I am willing to "train" which is to say regularly go out and run and try to improve.

 

I have no idea what I can do now. I am probably going to go out later today and get a rough idea of what I am capable of now. I'll update this when I do. I was just curious to hear from those who do run if those times are reasonable. I really have no idea what is "good" or not. Those numbers just seem good to me.

 

I also want to do something more active for cardiovascular health / training. So i will probably jog or something in any case. I really don't think sedentary + lifting for an hour a day is the best lifestyle.

 

UPDATE: there's a little 2 mile one way trail literally right next to my place. It's actually blocked off (construction) half way so it's currently a 2 mile round trip. I ran there and walked back. So apparently I can do a 9 minute mile currently, but only one in a row. I wasn't going all out but I was not happy at the end either. I could have likely gone faster if pretty girls were watching, but probably not too much faster.

 

This gives me a little idea of things, but my first time out in over a decade doesn't really say much as far as what would be reasonably easy to achieve without interfering with lifting.

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haha I was just about to post that

Greg Nuckols defines 'fitness' as being able to hit a 225 bench (not huge I know) 315 squat, 385 DL, 24 minute 5k, 175-185 BW, and decent mobility (those weight are all pounds obviously)

that's not his definition of awesome, just fit, so I don't think what you're trying to do is impossible, with the right programing

this page http://www.completehumanperformance.com/so-you-want-to-run-part-2.html

outlines a specific plan for PLing and running a faster 5k. I'm using it, and went from 10+ minute mile to 9+ minute mile fairly quickly (I know I'm slow, I'm a fat older guy lol) it might be worth a try if you want to progress well at both goals

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I agree that those standards would be considered "fit".

 

As of right now I think I just need to get some more time on the track to get more information as to where I stand. I assume this is like any physical adaptation where you'll get noob gains and progress rather quickly simply by doing the activity, even without complex programming.  I hypothesize that I can get some gains simply by doing what I did last time, walk / jog warmup for a mile and then run the mile back. By doing that several times a week I assume I will get to the point where my calves don't cripple me the next day. And I would expect my time to drop significantly simply from that. The thing I don't know is how much it will drop since I really don't know much about running. Will this put me at 8:30 or 8 or 7:30? I have no idea.

 

All I have to go on is the fact that a sub 20 5k seems pretty good and people online seem to agree, which means about a 6:30 pace. The army PT test is a 2 mile and you max that out at 13 minutes (6:30). A single mile of 6:30 seems really good to me by itself, although I'm given to understand that in terms of competitive sports it is average to slow. I have heard many people including Rip say that the army PT test simply isn't that difficult and you can max it out without much training (like once a week). And this is while lifting is your primary goal and the running is not even important (just something you do because the army makes you.)

 

In any case, that site looks interesting and I shall investigate it further as I wait for my calves to stop being a little bish.

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I tried just adding running to my lifting and my times and lifts suffered, but I'm 47 with low T, your mileage may vary

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I don't agree with Nuckol's definition of fit.  One could be categorized as physically fit, yet they can't just get under the bar and push/pull those numbers, nor perform a 5k in that time.  You achieve those specific results by training for those specific results.  /rant and hijack.

 

fit
adjective
 
  1. in good health, especially because of regular physical exercise.
    "I swim regularly to keep fit"
    synonyms: healthywell, in good health, in (good) shape, in (good) trim, in good condition, fighting fit, as fit as a fiddle; More

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To each his own, Doug, but a lot of fit people who don't lift (but do other forms of strength training) can hit some decent lifts the first time they get under the bar, and while I don't know his exact time, Donkey Kong, who sadly no longer posts here, said he pulled a decent k time without ever training specifically to do a 5k (though strongman training requires some healthy wind) so I'm pretty good with Knuckols' deffinintion

 

Hell, Ross Enamait, who doesn't normally do conventional squatting, DLing, or Benching, can put up better lifts than that

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Hi, Carl. Just saw this thread. I lift and run. I started running before I started strength training 3 years ago and have never stopped. I'm older and my dad has had heart issues since he was not much older than I am now, so running for general cardio health has always felt important to me. Plus I just feel so much better when I am running regularly. I sleep better, recover better and metabolize better.

That said, I only started getting moderately smart about my running training a few months ago. I found Alex Viada's 2-part series (Art posted the link to the second part above) tremendously helpful. Basically I've started adjusted the length and pace of my runs to dovetail better with my workouts. I don't program as elaborately as he suggests (for one thing I am doing 5/3/1, not Westside, which he recommends) but I have adopted some of the running drills he suggests and incorporated varied strides and pacing as part of my running program. These things have helped my form, my recovery and my understanding of all of it a great deal.

I've just started a new log (link in my signature) which outlines what I'm currently doing if you're interested.

Regarding the painful calves, I have dealt with that, shin splints, and other issues. I highly recommend foam rolling both your calves and the anterior tibialis (the muscle on the front of your lower leg right next to your shins) after running, especially if you're getting excessive tightness or soreness. I overlooked that for way too long - it's helped so much, the relief is almost instant. If you don't have a foam roller you can also use a tennis ball.

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