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Ghost

How You Feel Is A Lie

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And now backed with science. :P

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3323922/

 

"Fatigue is a Brain-Derived Emotion that Regulates the Exercise Behavior to Ensure the Protection of Whole Body Homeostasis

 

This article traces the evolution of our modern understanding of how the CNS regulates exercise specifically to insure that each exercise bout terminates whilst homeostasis is retained in all bodily systems. The brain uses the symptoms of fatigue as key regulators to insure that the exercise is completed before harm develops. These sensations of fatigue are unique to each individual and are illusionary since their generation is largely independent of the real biological state of the athlete at the time they develop."

 

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Interesting. Also keep in mind that the entire concept of limit strength is a "lie".

Everyone is capable of lifting a massive amount of weight but the body limits this so that you don't potentially injure yourself. You can never truly express your max strength in the gym. You would need to believe the situation is life or death to really do that.

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Yeah, they touch upon that a bit in the article referencing studies that found muscles were recruited only up to 60% in a max effort hill sprint or somesuch, haven't checked out the reference studies yet. 

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Yeah, I got a chance to read it completely now.

 

I suppose i makes sense though because if you truly could fatigue yourself completely and use all available muscle fibers you would literally be unable to stand up after a max set of squats. I'm not sure how long it would take to recover from that and be able to stand and walk again. Probably not long. But it's obvious why the body would fight to prevent such a state from occurring. In a more practical sense if you used your entire strength during a hunt, failed to subdue the beast, and then found yourself unable to effective get away due to complete fatigue, that would not be a good system.

 

As they said, you theoretically could push on to catastrophic failure (death). While there is no doubt that the physiological components have limits, it's interesting that those limits never really approached. 

 

It would be cool to see how far elite athletes push themselves during important competitions. It is always 65% or close to it? Are those athletes simply building more muscle and then using 65% of it, or are they pushing beyond the 65%? What about the light weights? Is their strength coming from an ability to constantly use 70 or 80% of their true strength? How close can you actually push without any any devastating effects?

 

Something else I've always wondered is why there is a limit to the amount of times you can do a set, even with (reasonable) unlimited rest in between sets. What makes a 2RM a 2 rep MAX. Why not, after 15 minutes of rest can't you do the set again. What lasting damage has occurred that doesn't recover in 10 minutes, or 30 minutes, or 1 hour even? And if you only use 65% of your fibers even in maximal effort, you would expect there to be plenty of fibers to use to repeat that 2RM over and over again.

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Something else I've always wondered is why there is a limit to the amount of times you can do a set, even with (reasonable) unlimited rest in between sets. What makes a 2RM a 2 rep MAX. Why not, after 15 minutes of rest can't you do the set again. What lasting damage has occurred that doesn't recover in 10 minutes, or 30 minutes, or 1 hour even?

 

 

I suspect that it's neurochemical in nature.  The muscles may have recovered the energy to perform the set again, but the neurological components have a longer recovery time.

 

Just conjecture, though.

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I only know That I have at one time or another PRed every lift I do while feeling, as another guy on here puts it, 'like a bag of smashed assholes'

That's really all the 'study' i need

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/asshole on

While I definitely think it is true, this isn´t "backed by science". That´s just some unsystematic review and thus no proper evidence.

/asshole off

 

One of our Iranians always says that you have to max out when you are the most tired. That´s how you get strong. His 200kg c&j @85kg is all the evidence I need.

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