Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
jamesq

Quad Dominant?

Recommended Posts

I'm back working out after a long hietus and have a friend who has started working out with me. I'm trying to introduce him to the squat but he really struggles. He seems to be quad-dominant and seems to push off from the balls of his feet  (although his heels remain on the ground.)

 

I've read online that you should unload all the weight and, just using the bar, ask the person to keep their toes in the air. We've tried this but his toes just drop back to the ground the moment his knees break. I've also notice his feet move outwards slightly using the descent.

 

Is this just a milder form of the 'heels in the air' problem? Should he focus on strengthening his posterior chain?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Work on ankle flexibility and cue "heels" or "midfoot". I doubt he is quad dominant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Forgot to mention I tested his ankle flexibility. He has a good/normal range...

 

The way his toes drop the moment his knees break makes me think it is a strength issue...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hamstring weak, everybody is. He would definitely get use out of PC work, but as an immediate fix put 5 lbs. plates underneath hit toes and that will help him put the weight on his heels.

For work to strengthen the weak ares:

-Sliding Leg Curls, Leg Curls, GHR's.

-RDL's, Good Mornings, Back Raises.

-Hip Thrusts, Glute Bridges.

Pick one in each group (the one that he can perform correctly) and have him hammer those, that will fix any posterior chain.

That is all assuming that he is wearing the right shoes and like K mentioned, has ankle and hip mobility.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, that looks very helpful. Thanks a lot.

 

So when his knees break he can no longer rely on his bone structure for support and because he's quad dominant his quads drive the balls of his feet into the ground causing his raised toes to drop. Would that be an accurate assessment?

 

Not sure he'll have the discipline to do this sort of work. I've managed to convince him that leg workouts are not "for girls" but this might be a step too far. Any idea how long he should do this before he starts to see improvements?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The quick fix should show immediately, the other work will take time. It's not that his quads drive him onto his toes, rather his CNS realizes that he'll need to get leverage for his quads rather than his hips because his quads give a better chance of liifting the load safely.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If he hasn't ever done leg workouts I don't really think it's a problem of having a dominant muscle. Also if he can't even squat the empty bar with good form can it really be a strength issue? Seems to me the solution is just working on his technique to allow him to squat correctly.

 

You can do a lot of stuff to help some one keep their heels on the floor while squatting, vary stance, toes direction, help with set up so someone is in a good position to start the lift, work on mobility and just give useful cues to push the weights right.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He's probably leaning forward too much from the start.  Any amount of forward lean will cause you to go on your toes.

 

If you use 75% of the weight you are using now, do pause squats with a focus of keeping the weight mid-foot, he will start to get a feel for how the squat should feel unpaused.  It doesn't have to be a long pause--just long enough to reinforce proper balance.  Once the balance of the bar gets sorted out, he'll be able to work up to bigger numbers.

 

Just concentrate on getting him stronger overall, including the upper back and core muscles.  And above all, have patience.  As long as there is improvement keep working at it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Same kind of thing used to happen to me. I did (and still do!) lots of extra mobility work. It took me about 3 months to get properly sorted out.

 

or

 

 

or

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×