klimmilksq

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About klimmilksq

Profile Information

  • First Name
    Peace out bye
  • Location
    Peace out bye
  • Gender
    Male
  • Height
    5'11.5"
  • Body Weight
    89kg
  • Squat PR
    200kg BS/162kg FS
  • Press PR
    Push Press 107kg/ Bench Press 130kg
  • Deadlift PR
    245kg [post-back injury]

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  1. +1 Everything Simon said. The trainer at your gym is full of shit.
  2. I have dealt with kneecap issues for the better part of 2016, and multiple times before. Each time the pain lessened with strengthening exercises ranging from squatting with a slower more controlled descent, isometric quad flexing, hamstring strengthening, glute activation but also stretching of the quads, hams, calves, hips, etc. Also don't be afraid to try different exercises. If deadlifting is still doable then deadlift or if lunges don't bother you do lunges, find exercises you can do comfortably with no pain. Knee pain really sucks, don't be dumb like I have been and try and push through it... that can just lead to messing up your technique, muscle imbalances and sets you back even more.
  3. Anything can define a good workout, be it getting more reps, more sets, improved form, increased weight or just a good feeling during/after the session.
  4. Soreness is not an indicator of a good workout.
  5. http://lmgtfy.com/?q=Heretic
  6. The differences are fairly small and it's probably not gonna make or break ones progress, other things related to motivation will be more apt to hold back progress.
  7. It could, but generally I find if I just get some light movement in I can lessen the soreness. Even attempting to flex seems to help for me atleast. Sleep helps too.
  8. Muscle soreness tends to dissipate fairly quickly and sometimes feels better after some light movement. Injuries tend to be fairly obvious and well painful.
  9. You should take a look at the success story of Jesse "Wetbreasts" Shand, he lost a large amount of weight and he logged his activities daily online. Here is the link to the article on bodybuilding.com: http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/350-pounds-and-counting-jesse-shands-incredible-journey.html Don't be discouraged if progress is slow or if there are any bumps along the way. We all have to start somewhere. Best of luck.
  10. https://www.amazon.com/Body-Solid-Body-Solid-Olympic-Adapter/dp/B003TPREXO ^ Something like this?
  11. Just testing this out.

  12. I have experience with this, I've had 2 pretty bad sacroiliac joint injuries. 1. Rest may do the trick if it's just a mild injury, if there is any displacement of the joint you may need help from a physiotherapist. Rest is really a factor dependent on many variables and injuries do not have set time frames in which they heal. 2. I found when I could return to squats and deads I had to really (and I mean REALLY) focus on proper abdominal bracing. You may find even when the area has healed that you might still have mild pain at times. 3. I had been given recommended stretches, mostly none of them I did because they only made things more painful for me. Do some searching around google to see if you can find anything that might help you in the stretching department. I did find glute activation exercises brought me the most relief when it was really bad but did not solve the problem. 4. Anything that isn't painful really, so whatever upper body lifts don't bother it, leg curls could work so long as you don't end up in hyperextension in your back. Bulgarian split squats could help, if you can do lunges painfree they could be helpful. Basically train around the injury. This site http://breakingmuscle.com/mobility-recovery/why-your-si-joint-is-such-a-pain-and-4-exercises-to-fix-it-0 has some fairly decent information, I would take the advice of seeking professional help if you can.
  13. Twas to the op of the thread. But your roll and pop could be meniscus or ligament related?
  14. Could be your iliotibial band snapping over a bony protrusion, or it could be an injury of the vastus lateralis muscle.