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littlesimongeorge

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About littlesimongeorge

  • Rank
    Heavy Lifter
  • Birthday 04/25/1979

Profile Information

  • First Name
    Simon
  • Location
    London, UK
  • Gender
    Male
  • Height
    6'3"
  • Body Weight
    260/117kg
  • Squat PR
    227.5kg x1
  • Press PR
    Bench 170kg paused / Press 115kg / Viking Press 140kg x2
  • Deadlift PR
    240kg x6

Recent Profile Visitors

5,208 profile views
  1. Overhead Press - Could it lead to lower back injury?

    If you don't keep tight, yes you can damage your lower back but the same can be said for just about any weight lifting movement. I went through a stage where I kept hurting my back due to over extension, so I switched to seated press to build strength and only moved to standing press for a one off max effort. The barbell standing press is a rare sight in most gyms so no surprises about the instructors comments.
  2. November 2015 Ironstrong Strength Extravaganza

    Injured my pec so don't think I'll be going for a bench PB, I was aiming for 380 :'(
  3. November 2015 Ironstrong Strength Extravaganza

    I forgot about this, might enter for bench, possibly deadlift
  4. Squat Progression

    Yeah, I never quite understood that either. Front squats are awesome!
  5. Pursuing Better, Not Best

    The two most important aspects of lifting, 1. Learn to perform the lifts safely to avoid fucking yourself up. It might take some experimentation with stance and grip, but just do shit properly. That includes machine based training too. 2. Be consistent and patient. That's about it. Maybe a third, keep shit simple but that's more of a preference as some trainees just enjoy a lot of variation regardless of whether it brings them any real benefits. I like the goal of just getting better. The internet is especially bad for sucking noobs into bodyweight to power ratio arguments. I firmly believe there's no "should" when it comes to lifting and bodyweight. All variables being equal (programming, muscle mass, levers, muscle insertions etc) a bigger lifter has the greater "potential" to outlift smaller lifters. Those variables are rarely equal, especially among casual internet permabulkers from across the globe. So for me as a non competitive casual the focus is just to get better.
  6. Paused Bench 155kg/341lb 3x2:

  7. The New Approach To Training Volume

    Scan read the article and agree with what I saw. Rep range and intensity is pretty much down to preference rather than x reps = strength x reps = bodybuilding. (Within reason obviously) I'd say their are slight differences in the physiques but that might just be down to the old fact that people are attracted to the sport they're naturally good at. A 6'9" long armed, bucket handed strongman is unlikely to succeed in bodybuilding. A 5'4" short compact bodybuilder is unlikely to do well in strongman. So naturally at any given comp for those sports you'll find a common theme in the physiques on display. Not because the training makes them look different but because they naturally gravitate to the sport that suits them.
  8. The New Approach To Training Volume

    8? Half it, then divide by 2... Lol
  9. Over the last 4 months I've increased frequency while still only training 3 times per week. I just alternated between upper and lower, so I've gone from 4 sessions per movement per month to 6 sessions per movement per month. It's worked really well for me. I think 5 days a week is unnecessary if your goal is to just get stronger with the barbell movement. Obviously most people who touch a weight tend not to have that as their only goal. I think 5 days lends itself more to physique goals because it's easier to split the work up across days. I know some guys do push/pull/legs 6 times a week, basically 3 days on, 1 day off, rinse and repeat. But with that routine you won't use the barbell movements each time. The first 3 days might be the heavier work with a barbell, the second 3 day phase would be lighter accessory work.
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