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Steve Justa's Singles Routines

singles high frequency rock iron steel steve justa

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#1 darkangel

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Posted 06 December 2011 - 01:52 PM

First of all, some info on Steve Justa for those who don't know the guy:

Steve Justa is 40 (at the time "Rock, Iron, Steel" was published), has been training over 20 years and can boast feats of strength such as the following: Back lift 4500lbs! Quarter deadlift with 2050lb. Carried a 200lb vest for 2 miles, walked half a mile with a 700lb barbell, barbell walk with 1400lb for 40 steps, carried 220lb rock for 1 mile, etc etc. You get the point. He's ridiculously strong.


(A quick google search will give you some more info)

In his book "Rock, Iron, Steel" he outlines the following routines based on doing singles frequently and around 70% of your max which he calls the target zone:

Singles Strategy No.1 — One Lift
1. Lift every day, seven days a week.
2. Use 70% to start out and, as you gain strength, keep using 70%
3. During Week One:
• Day 1 – Do three singles with one to two minutes rest in between
• Day 2 – Do five singles with one to two minutes rest in between
• Day 3 – Do seven singles with one to two minutes rest in between
• Day 4 – Do nine singles with one to two minutes rest in between
• Day 5 – Do 11 singles with one to two minutes rest in between
• Day 6 – Do 13 singles with one to two minutes rest in between
• Day 7 – Do 15 singles with one to two minutes rest in between
You have now made a complete cycle and are at Week 2, Day 1. Now you will add five or 10 lbs and go through the whole cycle again.
4. Once a month, test your max to make sure you are using weights in your weekly cycle that are 70% of your max. If your weekly cycle weight was more than 70%, take weight off and adjust. If your weekly cycle weight was under 70%, add weight and adjust. This monthly testing of your max will keep you in the target zone.
This workout must be done seven days a week, 365 days a year. Each week, you are building your endurance and toughening your tendons and ligaments by doing more and more work towards the end of each cycle, and then during the next week, or cycle as I call it, you're adding more weight and doing it all over again. The great thing about this type of training is that you will build great strength without really ever making yourself tired because the body is adjusting naturally and rhythmically.

Singles Workout Strategy No.2 — One Lift
1. Lift every other day, seven days a week, 365 days a year.
2. Use weights that are 70% of your max.
3. Do 30 singles with between one and two minutes rest in between. When you reach a total of 30, you are done. Rest a day. Then add five lbs the next workout and do 30 singles with one to two minutes rest in between. Rest a day. Add five lbs every other day, resting one day in between, and so on and so forth.
4. Then once every two weeks, max out and adjust your weekly poundage to make sure you are using 70% of your max. If you're using under 70%, add weight and adjust. If you're using more than 70%, take weight off to adjust. This will keep you in the target zone.

Singles Workout Strategy No. 3 — Three Lifts, eg. squat, bench press and deadlift
1. Lift every day, seven days a week, 365 days a year.
2. Do four singles in each lift with one to two minutes rest in between and go from one lift to the next quickly. Start with the squat, then go to the bench press, then go to the deadlift; use 70% of your max.
3. Add five lbs to your bench every three days; add 10 lbs to your squat and deadlift every four days.
4. Max out every three weeks in all three lifts. If using weights in excess of 70%, reduce weight to adjust. If using weights under 70%, add weight to adjust. This will keep you in your target zone. Concentrate on speed when performing the lifts during your daily workouts.

Singles Workout Strategy No.4 — Three Lifts eg. squat, bench and deadlift
1. Train every other day, seven days a week, 365 days a year.
2. Train Bench Squat, Bench Deadlift, Bench Squat, Bench Deadlift, every other day, so on and so forth.
3. Do 25 singles with one or two minutes rest between each single in the deadlift and the squat and do 12 singles in the bench on each squat and deadlift day. For example:
Mon – squat 25 singles, bench 12 singles
Tues – off
Wed – deadlift 25 singles, bench 12 singles
Thurs – off
Fri – squat 25 singles, bench 12 singles
Sat – off
Sun – deadlift 25 singles, bench 12 singles
4. Every week add 20 lbs to your squat and deadlift and 10 lbs to your bench.
5. Every month, max out in each lift and if the poundages you're using in your weekly workouts are over 70%, decrease weight to adjust. If the weight is under 70%, add weight to your weekly workouts and adjust. This way you stay at your target weight of 70% max in workouts.

Singles Workout Strategy No.5 — 10 to 15 Lifts
1. Work two days on, one off, seven days a week, 365 days a year. Work all 10-15 lifts on each day.
2. Do two singles in each lift with one to two minutes rest in between each lift and for each single use 70% of your max.
3. Add five to 10 lbs to each lift every three days.
4. Every two weeks max out in every lift; adjust all weights in your daily workouts to 70% of your max in each lift. The day that you max will be your workout for that day.

Singles Workout Strategy No. 6 — 30 to 40 Lifts
1. Work every other day or once every three days depending on how you feel. Do all 30-40 lifts in one workout.
2. Do one single in each lift, moving from one lift to the next every two to three minutes. Use 70-85% of your max.
3. Add five to 10 lbs to each lift once a week.
4. Max out on all lifts once a month; then adjust all lifts to fit between 70 and 85% of your max on each lift. This will keep you in your target zone.

The Target Zone
The target zone should be between 70% to 80% of your maximum effort in any one lift. This is the zone you must stay in when training to get the strongest the fastest. There are two important things to remember about the target zone:
#1. When you exceed the target zone this is when you go too heavy in your lifting too fast.
#2. The second thing about the target zone that makes it work is the speed factor.

Source:
Rock, Iron, Steel (Steve Justa)
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#2 Tryfis

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 07:06 AM

Thanks for the info!
jpez was doing the first routine 1,5 years ago I think. Maybe he has a comment to make.
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#3 StevieB

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 10:07 AM

Interesting, thanks for the info.
Is the book good?...Might pick it up anyway for the craic
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#4 darkangel

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 11:11 AM

The book is very good, has all kinds of info on unconventional training methods: g-force training, static holds, singles only, weighted runs/carries, partials, barrels, etc...
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#5 jpez

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Posted 09 December 2011 - 10:09 AM

I did the first one for 2-3 cycles for the deadlift when I didn't have a rack. Of course it works and I guess it's a good way to get a lift up if you feel one of your lifts need more attention. I actually injured my back when trying my 1rm after one of the cycles but it had nothing to do with the routine. I had the brilliant idea of going on a cut and while on that cut trying to lift more than I could handle during the 1rm attempt. Not a very bright thing to do. I won't be trying any of these routines again though because I believe there are better ways to train but it was a good experience.
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#6 Nathan

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 04:15 AM

I own the book too--it's almost worth it just for the odd ball strength endurance feets he folklores about--I still think about his buddy the nation-wide barroom brawler who could wrist curl 275lbs, let alone all the unorthodox training systems. Very cool.
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